What to Expect During Martial Law And What You Can Do To Ensure Your Safety – Get Ready To Move Your Family ASAP When SHTF

In case you don’t know, martial law is when the government takes over a designated territory, suspends constitutional rights, and enforces authoritarian power with the use of the military. Basic civilian rights such as a trial before imprisonment and other democratic processes are limited or suspended completely. Every democracy has the potential for martial law.

Martial law usually happens during something like large riot, a terrorist attack, or a large scale natural disaster. During frightening events like these, many people prefer to give up their rights so they can have the peace of mind an authoritarian government offers. Who needs rights as long as you can feel safe from looters, right? The trouble is, there have been instances where martial law has gone too far.

Here are a few things to expect during martial law and what you can do to ensure your safety.

1. Confiscation of Firearms

As it shows in the video above, one of the first things to occur under martial law is the confiscation of firearms. Any civilian with a firearm will be deemed a threat, which means it’s important to hide your weapons in a place that only you and trusted family or friends know about. Have multiple stashes so if one stash is found, you can pretend that’s all there is. If you have a bunker, keep some weapons and firearms there as well. Make sure you have plenty of ammo, too.

Expect to be searched without cause. Anything that is found on you is in danger of being taken. Keep this in mind when going out so that you don’t lose something valuable to government forces or other opportunistic enemies. Also, if you have children in your home, please keep your gun in a combination safe.

2. Curfew

Curfew under martial law will be strictly enforced, and it is inadvisable to break it. In the event that you must go out past curfew, be prepared. Know back routes and less traveled paths to your destination. Stealth is of the utmost importance, so be sure you have the appropriate gear to move about quickly and undetected. If you must travel in groups, keep them small. The larger the group, the higher the risk of being detected.

3. Restriction of Free Speech

Your constitutional rights are void under martial law, so it’s best to keep your opinions to yourself. There will be people who will object to martial law, and those that loudly protest will suffer. A protester during martial law is likely to be imprisoned and possibly shot. If you have the desire to rally together a militia, do so with extreme care and discretion. Militias typically operate underground as they are the weaker and smaller force.

4. Forcible Removal from Property

Just because you own the land or house you live in doesn’t mean you’ll be allowed to stay there once martial law is in place. Depending on the situation, it is possible that many people, including you, will be relocated. They may also decide to set up camp in your home, so be prepared for this. Have a bug out bag ready at all times in the event of martial law so when the time comes you can relocate quickly and safely.

You may choose to stay on your property and in your house, but it would be a high-risk move for the average home owner. The precautions taken to prevent the take-over of your home are only going to be effective against looters and not against well-equipped and trained government forces.

5. Confiscation of Food Supplies

Along with your firearms, military forces may choose to take your food supplies as well as other basic living essentials. If you have any medicine you need, hide it somewhere. Keep most of your medicine in your bunker, a little on your person, and the rest in a hidden location in case you are unable to bunker down in time. While most people stock up on food supplies at home, it would be wise to have a good stock of food and water in a well-prepared bunker. Homes are easy targets and may be raided for supplies by military forces, leaving you high and dry as well as dependent on the government for your next meal.

6. Detained or Imprisoned at Will

For whatever reason, you may be imprisoned by military forces without provocation. They may find you suspicious or threatening, mistake you for someone else, or just hate your face. The best thing to do under military law is to stay out of sight. Never draw attention to yourself. In the event that you are in the presence of or confronted by government forces, always act as a good citizen should, being readily obedient until you can slip away.

When Has Martial Law Been Enacted Throughout History?

National martial law in the United States was only declared once, and that was in the great Civil War. Keep in mind that the national level requires the declaration of the President or the Congress. Other than that, history has shown that martial law has been limited to states.

Use of military force was enforced in instances such as the Whiskey Rebellion and during the Civil War, but there wasn’t any declaration of martial law. Here are some more instances where martial law was enacted throughout history:

Freedom Riders – Alabama governor Patterson declared martial law on May of 1961 in order to combat the agitators coming in the state specifically to violate Alabama’s laws and customs.

Hawaii Territory – Hawaii was held in December 7 1941 under martial law during WW2 and was not lifted until October 24 1944. Hawaii’s federal judges later condemned the rule stating that a military dictatorship was set up not in the island’s best interests, but to those of the army.

San Francisco 1934 – Frank Merriam, governor of California during 1934 declared martial law and cited “unlawful tumult and riots” when dock workers held a strike. The National Guard was summoned to open up the docks and were able to successfully control it, averting the crisis. Furthermore, the guardsmen were given the power to make arrests or detain the employees for later court trials.

Tulsa Race Riot – The Oklahoma National Guard decreed martial law in 1921 in response to KKK members conspiring to eradicate Black Wall Street. The plan was to wipe out the business center of African Americans by jealous whites. Those who tried to flee were shot or lynched by the KKK.

Coal Wars in West Virginia – Martial law was declared for the West Virginia state when coal wars erupted in the years 1920 to 1921. Federal troops were sent by Governor Cornwell’s orders to rally up the miners who rallied. It was one of the few martial laws that was used for ostensible reasons, as the army officers used their power to jail union members. Martial law dictatorship by Governor Cornwell and the army ended with Sid Hatfield’s trial.

Colorado Coalfield – War Martial law was imposed on the climax of the Colorado Coalfield War in 1914. The decades-long conflict finally bubbled over and it was the town of Ludlow, Colorado that took the hit. As such, the Colorado National Guard was summoned to calm the protests. The shifting of National Guard opinions led to clashes and resulted in the Ludlow Massacre. American President Wilson ended the violence by sending in the federal troops.

1906 San Francisco  Earthquake Presidio – troops were called to action after the great earthquake in 1906. Martial law was declared and the guards were stationed all throughout San Francisco. Dynamite was utilized to destroy buildings in the path of fire to prevent it from spreading further.

1892 Coeur d’Alene – Mine workers shot at opposing miners and destroyed a mill in the 1892 Coeur d’Alene incident in Idaho.  The governor promptly called for martial law, summoned the guardsmen and requested for federal troops as well. The result was the arrest of over 600 people, which ended with the court martial of more than 20 ringleaders.

The Chicago Fire – Roswell Mason, then mayor of Chicago, declared martial law in 1871 after the Great Chicago Fire. He then ordered General Philip Sheridan to take over and put the city under control on October 9 1871. When the great fire was put out, the state of martial law was lifted in just a few days.

Ex parte Milligan – President Abraham Lincoln imposed martial law authorized by the congress on September 15 1863. The act effectively suspended habeas corpus throughout the whole of United States, declaring the suspension on spies, aiders, prisoners of war and enemy abettors. It was later challenged by the Ex parte Milligan and won as the Supreme Court ruled the martial law as unconstitutional.

The War of 1812 – General Andrew Jackson declared the state of emergency in New Orleans, Lousiana during the War of 1812. He then successfully fought off the invading British, but kept the martial law active, saying he didn’t receive the official word of peace.

The American Revolution – Parliament effectively passed the Government Act of Massachusetts after the Boston Tea Party, which suppressed any and all assemblies and town meetings. It also imposed an appointed government, which is very similar to the current martial law we have today.

Summary

Martial law has happened countless times before, and it is bound to happen again. if martial law is in place, you are in danger and it is in your best interest to hide until normal government functions resume. It is important that you at least have a plan of action for when martial law takes place. Your survival is all that will matter in that time, and it will not be an easy effort. There are many opportunists and bad people out there that will thrive under martial law. You will need to be able to defend yourself from such people.

Defending yourself from an attack is the worst case scenario and best avoided by staying out of sight. Don’t go out in public, and especially avoid high trafficked areas. Learn basic survival skills like hunting and off grid cooking. You must be ready for anything. If you have a bunker to hide out in, be sure not to take any cell phones or GPS devices that could give away your location (even if you think you can’t get a signal underground). Only leave your bunker or hiding spot when absolutely necessary. Your welfare during martial law will depend on your preparedness.

Could You Turn Friends/Family/People Away When the SHTF? This Question We Need to Ask Ourselves and Think About Very Seriously

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One part of prepping that is sometimes overlooked or not given the consideration it deserves is what you will do when someone comes knocking on your door. I’m not talking about the wondering stranger, I’m talking about close family members that may or may not know you are prepping.

The question we need to ask ourselves and think about very seriously is who you would turn away, and what extended family members would you help out in a disaster or SHTF event.

Unfortunately this is just the first step, now you need to think about how you are going to handle the situation of having extra mouths to feed. This is all dependent on whether you decide to help them or turn them away, and as I said in the last article, (and I am talking about close family, not the entire family) I just couldn’t turn close family members away. If you could, my bet is there are other circumstances that weigh into your decision other than survival.

Missed it by That Much…

How would you decide who could stay and who needed to go away? This is a tough question, but it’s one we really need to put a lot of thought into. Deciding on who would make the cut could be the difference between surviving and thriving, or throwing everything you have down the tubes.

To me there are a few factors that I would have to think about…

1. How Close Are They?

It’s just not feasible to think that you can bring everyone and everyone they bring with them in during an SHTF event, most of us can barely afford to get ourselves prepared. Like it or not, we are going to have to figure out how to say “I just can’t do it”

In the podcast we used my son and his fiancée as an example, I absolutely want him here, and I know he won’t come without her. She has her twin sister that she is very close to and who knows who else she would want to bring along, so how do I handle that situation?

As much as it would pain me I would have to have a conversation with my son and tell him that he has a choice to make. If he chooses to stay it will only be him and her, if he chooses to stay with her I would help as much as I could and send them on their way.

2. What is my Family’s Opinion?

In any marriage we are bound to have different opinions about people than our spouse, and this should weigh heavily into your decision. Your husband or wife’s opinion about your favorite cousin might be completely different than yours.

Have a conversation now with your family about who would stay and why, try to put personal feelings aside and come to a rational conclusion about whether they would be an asset or a hindrance to your survival plan. Also, try not to get into an argument when you’re talking about this, a divorce is the last thing you want.

3. How Helpful Have They Been?

During your conversation with your family your past experiences with this person are bound to come up. What is their personality like? And how has our past relationship been?

Some people are helpful, some are all about themselves and some people are know it all’s. We can tolerate these personality traits now, but in an SHTF situation these traits will be magnified.

4. How Helpful Would They Be?

I dig a little deeper into this later, but think about how they would benefit your situation, what skills do they have that would help you in a disaster situation. Even if someone is a “one upper” and it drives you crazy, they might have skills that would be useful to you.

Do they have carpentry, electrical, gardening or welding skills? In situations like these we will need to weigh the good with the bad to figure out if we give them a thumbs up, or a thumbs down.

5. What Challenges Do They Bring?

Just as important as thinking about what they bring to the table is what they will be taking from the table. The truth is that any time you add someone to the equation the situation becomes more complicated, and sometimes the negatives so outweigh the positives you need to make that tough decision.

The Double Edged Sward

As much as it drives me nuts knowing that I shouldn’t have to prepare for someone who doesn’t see why it’s important, I do understand that this is a catch 22 that I might have to deal with.

We can barely prepare for ourselves, let alone for the family members that might end up on our doorstep, but unless you are willing to turn everyone away it is a problem you are bound to face.

One other option that could be another article all by itself is bugging out altogether. We always think about security from marauders and criminals, but what if so many people end up at your door that you have no option other than leave, you might have to.

How Much Extra do you Prepare?

Because we can only do what we can do, and sometimes storage space and money are limited I think more along the lines of “how can they make my situation better?” Maybe saying that you should turn this into a positive is a little optimistic, but at least try to make it a little less negative.

Storing extra beans, rice, flour and dry goods will go a long way and give you the basics you will need, but at some point it will run out. Have plans in place to use them like you would an employee, start thinking like a post collapse CEO.

Set the guidelines and expectations from day one. You need to let them know that if you are going to let them stay there for however long that might be you expect them to help. What is impossible for 2 or 3 people to do in a day might be possible with more people, expanding the garden, foraging, hunting, raising more animals for food and building/repairing will become more possible with more people.

The Come to Jesus Talk

At first we might need to lower our expectations because most unprepared people will try to hold on to their Pollyanna reality as long as possible, they will be like a junkies going through withdraws. This is why it’s important to set your expectations from day one.

You might hear things like “why are you rationing the water? This will be over in a day or two?” or “Look at all this food, were going to eat like kings!” These people might have no idea what we could be in for, and need to be set straight before it becomes a problem.

At some point it might become necessary to have what I call the “come to Jesus talk” people will tell you whatever you want to hear to get your help, but if they are not holding up their end of the bargain you might have to have the tough conversation neither one of you want to have.

You might have to say…

“This is what you told me you would do when you came here, and this is what you are actually doing (or not doing), how are we going to fix this? Does this mean you need to go? Or are you going to get onboard and pull your weight?”

Problems like these are bound to happen, and these are situations we need to be able to face, otherwise disappearing and not letting people know where you are might be the better option.

What Would you Do?

This is a question a friend in our Facebook group posed and we dig into it because it is a situation we might need to think about. Would you turn people away and why? Let us know in the comments below.

Note: I have no problem with people disagreeing with me and explaining why, but is you are just going to be negative and rude don’t bother commenting…it won’t be approved.

11 Powerful Plants That Kill Pain Fast

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“The art of healing comes from nature and not from the physician. Therefore, the physician must start from nature with an open mind.”

These wise words come from the Swiss physician, philosopher and alchemist known simply as Paracelsus (1493-1541). Paracelsus taught that the human body was a complex chemical system that had to be balanced with its environment. One way to keep your body in alignment with nature is by using plants to treat common physical ailments.

Whether your passion is emergency preparedness, homestead survival, or you just want to avoid modern medicine with all its side effects, you should check out these 11 powerful plants that can quickly relieve pain.

Here are 11 powerful plants that can quickly relieve pain.

Are you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800’s for up to three years? Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now…
WATCH THIS VIDEO and you will find many interesting things!

lost-ways

Aloe Vera

The ancient Egyptians called Aloe Vera the “plant of immortality,” and for good reason. The gel from the Aloe Vera plant contains significant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.

You can use this gel to soothe burns, cuts, scrapes, and even cold sores. When you drink it in juice form, it helps the gastrointestinal tract to function at an optimal level.

Similar to a cactus, the Aloe Vera plant has long serrated edges. A translucent gel is found within the thick fleshy part between the layers of tough skin. Here is how to remove the gel.

  1. Break off a leaf as close to the stem as possible and place it on a cutting board.
  2. Then use a sharp knife to slice away both ends and to remove the spiny edges.
  3. Now, hold the leaf with one hand on the top layer of skin as you slide the knife between the top layer of skin and the gel beneath it. Set that skin layer aside.
  4. Next, slide the knife between the gel and the other piece of skin as you repeat the process.

You now should have a section of aloe gel that you can apply directly to the skin for pain relief. Another option is to blend the gel with other smoothie ingredients to help relieve indigestion.

Basil

Fragrant basil does much more than just add flavor and aroma to your favorite Mediterranean recipes. It can help relieve congestion caused by colds and flu, and it can help relax muscles and improve blood circulation.

Here is how to make soothing basil tea.

  1. Snip about a dozen basil leaves.
  2. Combine them with a teaspoon of ginger in a skillet or pan and stir gently over low heat until the leaves have softened.
  3. Add a cup of water and boil the mixture for a few minutes.
  4. Add a teaspoon or so of honey if desired and then sip the tea throughout the day, especially after meals.

Cloves

Cloves have analgesic and antibacterial properties that make them useful as a numbing agent for toothaches and gum pain. Here’s how to use them.

  1. Crush a few whole cloves before mixing them with an equal amount of cayenne pepper powder in a small bowl.
  2. Add just enough water to make a thick paste.
  3. Roll a cotton ball or a cotton swab into the mixture and apply the cotton directly to the affected area of the mouth.

As your saliva mixes with the paste, you will notice a numbing effect that eases pain and discomfort.

Dill

Commonly used to flavor deviled eggs and vegetable dishes, dill also can be used for medicinal purposes. A natural diuretic, dill has properties that can help ease anxiety, insomnia, hiccups, menstrual cramps, and digestive disorders.

You can make a dill powder by simply grinding up the seeds. For ailment relief, take a teaspoon of the powder twice a day for up to 21 days. For best results, hold the powder under your tongue for about 10 minutes.

You can make dill tea with two teaspoons of mashed dill seeds per cup of hot water. Let the seeds steep for about 10 minutes until the tea has a yellow color. Use a filter to remove the seeds, then sip the tea.

Garlic

The ancient Greek physician Hippocrates, known as the Father of Western Medicine, prescribed garlic to treat many medical complaints. The ancient Egyptian, Babylonians, Greeks, Romans and Chinese civilizations also favored garlic for medicinal uses.

Consuming garlic can boost the immune system and it has both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that may help ease arthritis and back pain.

To use garlic topically, you can crush about 10 fresh garlic cloves to make a paste. Apply the paste on the affected area, cover with a clean cloth and then leave in place for about 30 minutes.

Although cooked garlic still has health benefits, it is most effective in its raw state. Try adding raw garlic to homemade salad dressings, marinades, tomato sauces, soups and stews. Whether you’re using garlic raw or cooked, you can boost its benefits by first chopping or crushing it and then letting it sit for 10 minutes before either eating it as is or cooking it.

What if that were you? What would YOU do?

In the next few minutes, I’m going to show you the U.S. Nuclear Target map, where you’ll find out if you’re living in one of America’s Deathzones.

Easy_Cellar e

Ginger

The root of the ginger plant has anti-inflammatory properties that make it useful in treating headaches. muscle aches and overall body soreness. As a natural remedy for nausea, ginger help many women handle the uncomfortable waves of morning sickness that can come with early pregnancy.

To make ginger tea, grate about two inches of fresh raw ginger into a two-cup glass measuring cup. Then, pour boiling water to the 1-1/2 cup line. Let the tea steep for 10 minutes before straining it into a mug and adding honey or sugar to taste.

Lavender

Sweet-smelling lavender can serve as an antiseptic, a diuretic and a relaxant. Sipping lavender tea, made from lavender buds, can help relieve muscle soreness and muscle spasms. Lavender tea also can help fight off harmful bacteria and ease stomach irritation.

To brew homemade lavender tea, boil one tablespoon of dried lavender buds in two cups of water for 10 minutes. Strain. Add honey if desired. You may drink lavender tea up to three times a day or just before bedtime to help you relax. Be sure to inhale the aroma, which in itself has healing properties.

Mint

Mint can serve as a decongestant during cold and flu season. It helps ease headaches, arthritis pain and indigestion. In addition, mint has antiseptic and antibacterial properties that make it useful for treating cuts and burns.

Drinking freshly brewed mint tea contributes to fresh breath and reduces stomach bloating and indigestion.

To make a flavorful mint tea, you’ll need a large handful of fresh mint leaves. Roughly tear the leaves and places them in a strainer in your teapot. Add enough boiling water to cover the strainer and cover the teapot. Let the leaves steep for about 10 minutes.

Now gently crush the leaves with the back of a wooden spoon to release their oils. Before removing the strainer, press on the leaves once again to release all the liquid. Pour the mixture into a mug and sweeten as desired before drinking.

Parsley

Parsley is so much more than a decorative addition to a dinner plate. It is rich in vitamin C, vitamin A, iron, iodine and calcium. It also helps freshen breath.

Parsley can help reduce fluid retention and speed up the elimination of harmful toxins from the digestive tract.

To make soothing and nutritious parsley tea, place one teaspoon of crushed parsley seeds or two teaspoons of dried parsley leaves into one cup of boiling water. Let the mixture steep for 10 minutes before straining. Sip the tea up to three times a day.

Rosemary

Just smelling aromatic rosemary can benefit your brain’s cognitive function, including concentration and memory. Rosemary also can help ease muscular pain, indigestion and headaches. It has antibacterial properties, and it works to help detoxify the liver. When used topically, rosemary can help relieve toothaches, eczema and joint or muscle pain.

Place a fresh sprig of rosemary in a teapot and let it steep for five minutes. If you allow the sprig to steep longer, you will draw out more nutrients, but the tea will have a more bitter taste. Filter out the stem and needles and sip, adding your favorite sweetener as desired.

Thyme

Thyme has numerous antiseptic, antibacterial and antioxidant properties. As a tea, it can work as an expectorant, clearing the lungs of congestion during colds and flu. Thyme tea also soothes a sore throat, settles indigestion, reduces the discomfort of menstrual cramps and helps relieve other aches and pains.

To brew thyme tea, you first need to dry the leaves. Cut the stalks, wash them and dry them by letting them hang upside down in small bundles for about two weeks.

Then remove the dry thyme leaves before crushing them into a fine powder or leaving them whole for your tea.

Add one teaspoon of dried thyme leaves to two cups of boiling water. Then reduce heat to a simmer and cover the pot, allowing the leaves to steep for five minutes. Then strain the tea into a cup, adding lemon or honey as desired.

Conclusion

Plant-based remedies have been tested with time through the centuries — about eighty percent of the world’s population uses plants to treat everything from the common cold to high blood pressure. In many parts of the world, pharmacies even dispense herbs prescribed by physicians. In fact, as late as the mid-20th century in the U.S., many pharmaceutical companies offered plant-based medicines in tablet, ointment and liquid formulas.

Keep your eyes peeled because you may be able to find some of these herbs in your backyard. But if not, most of these herbs are relatively easy and enjoyable to grow. What’s more is that you can enjoy the health benefits of these plants year-round by growing them both outdoors and indoors, often on a sunny windowsill. As with any form of medication, it is to consult your health practitioner before beginning a new regimen of plant-based treatments.

If you’re interested in learning more old remedies, you should read The Lost Book Of Remedies.

The physical book has 300 pages, with 3 colored pictures for every plant and for every medicine.

Lost Book of Remedies pages

It was written by Claude Davis, whose grandfather was one of the greatest healers in America. Claude took his grandfather’s lifelong plant journal, which he used to treat thousands of people, and adapted it into this book.

Learn More…

Lost Book of Remedies cover

5 Common ‘Miracle Trees’ The Native Americans Used For Medicine

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It must have been a long process of trial and error. How do you figure out that a plant or tree can have medicinal benefits? Obviously, some Native Americans, as well as many other ancient cultures from China to the Incas and Aztecs, found solace and relief from plants that surrounded them.

Significantly, many of those natural cures were derived from trees. Typically, it was the inner bark of the trees or the xylem that provided the most potent mix of natural elements with curative properties. However, there are some exceptions, such as the needles of pines and the berries from Juniper trees.

We’re going to explore five common trees in North America that continue to be used for various medicinal purposes. They are:

  • White pine
  • White willow
  • Slippery elm
  • Juniper
  • Poplar

We’ll also review what type of preparation was used and how to prepare it for home use. A word of caution is related to allergies and dosage. Home preparation of natural cures is not always an exact science. Just as important, different people respond to these natural treatments in different ways, depending on their body weight and predisposition to allergies. In all cases, you should first consult your doctor. Take a low dose of any natural preparation you make, such as a teaspoon or less, to assess your body’s response. You should also avoid giving these natural treatments to young children.

Are you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800’s for up to three years? Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now…
WATCH THIS VIDEO and you will find many interesting things!

lost-ways

Bark and needles of pine were available year-round and used regardless of weather or season.  However, warmer months often provided the best concentration of ingredients due to the fact that the sap was still flowing in the xylem of the trees.

An infusion was the most common preparation technique. It’s essentially a tea made by soaking the inner bark or crushed pine needles in very hot, but not boiling water. Boiling water can break down some of the beneficial compounds. The steeping time was usually 5 to 20 minutes. The longer the steep the more concentrated the ingredients, so take good notes if you choose to make your own preparations to determine tolerable dosages.

Poultices were also used frequently to treat external afflictions. This involves an infusion or crushed ingredients that are saturated into a piece of cloth and applied to the skin where the pain or affliction is located.

As we’ve already noted, time of year in addition to the general health and age of the tree can also affect concentration of ingredients, so you may have to take that into account as well.

1. White pine

While the inner bark is often used as an infusion, the young shoots, twigs, pitch and needles of white pine were also used by Native Americans to treat a variety of conditions both internally and externally.

The pitch or pine sap was used as a poultice on a hot cloth and applied to the chest to treat coughs and pneumonia. Pitch applied directly to the skin was used to draw out boils, abscesses and splinters. It also was used as a poultice for wounds or sores.

An infusion of the crushed pine needles, often combined with the inner bark and young shoots, was used to treat colds, fever, heartburn, croup, laryngitis, bronchitis and coughs.

The scent of the white pine itself has aroma therapy properties, especially when applied externally to the chest or throat as a poultice for cough or sore throats.

2. White willow

We’ve covered the health benefits of willow bark in the past, but the medicinal value is so significant it makes sense to revisit the benefits. All willow trees have a chemical element called “salicin” in the inner, xylem bark. White willow has the highest concentrations. A German chemist synthesized this element in the 1800s and developed a tablet with both pain-relieving and fever-reducing properties. The chemist’s last name was “Bayer,” and the tablet he invented was called “aspirin.”

Native Americans would steep the xylem from the inner bark of the white willow in very hot water and drink it as a pain reliever and to reduce fever. One of the side benefits of this infusion for some people is that it does not thin the blood like regular aspirin. This has value for people on blood thinners, people with naturally thin blood due to genetics or diet, and people afflicted with hemophilia.

3. Slippery elm

Slippery Elm preparations were made from the inner bark and in some instances, the leaves. Once again, an infusion was made by Native Americans, often with a combination of inner bark and crushed leaves and used to treat digestive disorders, gastrointestinal conditions, gout, arthritis, stomach aches and sore throat. It also was used as a mouthwash or gargle to treat sore throat, mouth ulcers and toothache. As an external treatment it was used as a wash or poultice to treat skin conditions, hemorrhoids and insect bites.

As a poultice the infusion is poured into a piece of fabric and applied to the skin. It is said to have significant benefits for pain reduction, inflammation of wounds, boils, burns and skin ulcers. One recipe calls for five tablespoons of ground inner bark infused in a very hot cup of water and strained to make the basic infusion that can be either sipped or used as a wash or poultice. Here again, take a little at a time to assess its concentration and your reaction to the compound if you choose to use it as an herbal remedy.

4. Juniper

The Juniper is an evergreen that grows around the world. The small, round bluish berries are the primary flavor ingredient in gin. When the berries are fully ripe in late summer, Native Americans would eat them off the tree to treat kidney, bladder and urinary tract conditions, digestive disorders, gum disease, diarrhea, gout and arthritis, and rheumatic conditions.

There are some cautions to keep in mind. It’s believed that Juniper berries can cause miscarriage in pregnant women, and high doses can irritate the urinary tract. It also shouldn’t be given to children, considering their low body weight and the potential for even the smallest dosage to be too high.

5. Poplar buds

Poplar trees are ubiquitous across North America, and in the spring Native Americans used the poplar buds as a topical treatment for muscle soreness and headaches when applied to the brow as a poultice. The buds were usually ground, and the sticky result was applied to the skin, around painful joints or bruises or anywhere else localized pain occurred, including insect bites. It is not intended for internal use but as a topical treatment only.

The key ingredient in poplar buds that makes them effective as a topical pain reliever has a familiar name: salicin. This is the same chemical found in willow bark and used as the base ingredient in aspirin.

If you’re interested in learning more old remedies, you should read The Lost Book Of Remedies.

The physical book has 300 pages, with 3 colored pictures for every plant and for every medicine.

Lost Book of Remedies pages

It was written by Claude Davis, whose grandfather was one of the greatest healers in America. Claude took his grandfather’s lifelong plant journal, which he used to treat thousands of people, and adapted it into this book.

Learn More…

Lost Book of Remedies cover

How to Make Penicillin at Home (Just in Case SHTF)

Penicillin

What’s rotting in your kitchen right now? How about we grab it, and make life-saving antibiotics with it? We’ll take you through the steps, and you’ll be prepared if the world ends by Sunday.

Penicillin, the most famous antibiotic of all time, has saved millions of lives. And it’s quietly lurking in your kitchen right now. If you have that moldy piece of bread in a bag at the back of the fridge, or a rotting cantaloupe or orange in the crisper, you’re most likely growing penicillin by accident. In fact, penicillin’s whole discovery hinged on the fact that it was easy to grow accidentally.

The Accidental History of Penicillin

Infection has always been a killer, and while soap and water could prevent it externally, when it went internal humans were often helpless. Any anti-bacterial agent injected into the body would kill a person more quickly than the infection would. Then Alexander Fleming had the nasal drip felt round the world. He was working with a plate of bacteria when his nose dripped into them. The bacteria around the dripping died off, and he was encouraged by the idea that the body could tolerate internally a substance that could fight off bacteria.

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WATCH THIS VIDEO and you will find many interesting things!

Fleming’s next stroke of luck came when he lost his assistant. When dishes of bacteria were no longer useful, they were put in a sort of tub of bleach. Without his assistant, Fleming’s dirty dishes formed towers in the tub. The highest dishes sat well above bleach, and remained filthy. They grew even filthier when mold which had floated up from the lab downstairs started growing on them. And then they stopped being as filthy, when the mold, one of the many types of penicillium fungi, killed off the bacteria.

That was all the luck Fleming got. It took years to find a way to cultivate the right strain of penicillium, and to extract the right parts of it to make penicillin.

How to Make Your Own Penicillin

The strains that we have are from the mold grown on a cantaloupe in the 1940s, so you can grab some cantaloupe if you’re feeling like a traditionalist. Otherwise, a leftover crust of bread or the peel of some citrus fruit will do fine. The mold will start out gray, but as it develops will turn a bright blue-green. Once it gets started, cut the bread up into pieces and put it in a sterilized flask. (You can sterilize a flask by putting it in an oven at 315 degrees for an hour.) Incubate it in the flask for about a week at around seventy degrees.

Some people just stop there. Folk recipes for “penicillin tea” or “penicillin soup” abound, with people just boiling up the molded bread or adding the citrus to tea with honey, and serving it to sick people. (Note: Do not do this.)

If you want to get more involved, you can extract the penicillin by sterilizing yet another jar and, according to the experts, adding the following:

Into 500ml of cold tap water put 44.0 grams Lactose Monohydrate, 25.0 grams cornstarch, 3.0 grams sodium nitrate, 0.25 grams magnesium sulfate, 0.50 grams potassium phosphate mono, 2.75 grams glucose monohydrate, 0.044 grams zinc sulfate, 0.044 grams manganese sulfate. Then add enough cold tap water to make one liter. Use hydrochloric acid to adjust the pH to between 5.0 and 5.5.

Then you add the spores from the moldy bread. Another seven days incubation will leave the penicillin floating in the liquid portion of the results. A quick filter and you have penicillin.

Urgent Medical Disclaimer!

In theory, at least, you have penicillin. I must stress at this point that you should not use this homemade penicillin on any limb that you want to keep. Although you did probably get a lot of penicillium mold growing on the bread, you also got other molds. Even with the right kind of fungi growing, filtering out everything but the penicillin is difficult, and best left to the professionals. Molds make a lot of different things to kill bacteria, and many of them are harmful to humans. While there are plenty of survivalist websites that recommend clapping whatever grows on bread or citrus to your wound, and while that might even be an option sometimes after the world ends, there are better options right now, and you should take advantage of them. If you want to see how well you’ve done making penicillin, try growing a tray of bacteria and using the penicillin on that.

If you’re interested in learning more old remedies, you should read The Lost Book Of Remedies.

The physical book has 300 pages, with 3 colored pictures for every plant and for every medicine.

Lost Book of Remedies pages

It was written by Claude Davis, whose grandfather was one of the greatest healers in America. Claude took his grandfather’s lifelong plant journal, which he used to treat thousands of people, and adapted it into this book.

Learn More…

Lost Book of Remedies cover

Could you Really Turn Family Away During a Disaster? THIS IS A QUESTION IN EVERY PREPPERS MIND WITH IDYLLIC ANSWERS, UNTIL THE SHTF!

IMPORTANT: I wrote this post to get people to think about this very likely situation. Today we have the luxury of thinking in black and white, but each SHTF scenario will require different actions, and all those actions will have different consequences and repercussions. Whether you agree or disagree is not important…thinking about it is.

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One part of prepping that is sometimes overlooked or not given the consideration it deserves is what you will do when someone comes knocking on your door. I’m not talking about the wondering stranger, I’m talking about close family members that may or may not know you are prepping.

The question we need to ask ourselves and think about very seriously is who you would turn away, and what extended family members would you help out in a disaster or SHTF event.

Unfortunately this is just the first step, now you need to think about how you are going to handle the situation of having extra mouths to feed. This is all dependent on whether you decide to help them or turn them away, and as I said in the last article, (and I am talking about close family, not the entire family) I just couldn’t turn close family members away. If you could, my bet is there are other circumstances that weigh into your decision other than survival.

Missed it by That Much…

How would you decide who could stay and who needed to go away? This is a tough question, but it’s one we really need to put a lot of thought into. Deciding on who would make the cut could be the difference between surviving and thriving, or throwing everything you have down the tubes.

To me there are a few factors that I would have to think about…

1. How Close Are They?

It’s just not feasible to think that you can bring everyone and everyone they bring with them in during an SHTF event, most of us can barely afford to get ourselves prepared. Like it or not, we are going to have to figure out how to say “I just can’t do it”

In the podcast we used my son and his fiancée as an example, I absolutely want him here, and I know he won’t come without her. She has her twin sister that she is very close to and who knows who else she would want to bring along, so how do I handle that situation?

As much as it would pain me I would have to have a conversation with my son and tell him that he has a choice to make. If he chooses to stay it will only be him and her, if he chooses to stay with her I would help as much as I could and send them on their way.

2. What is my Family’s Opinion?

In any marriage we are bound to have different opinions about people than our spouse, and this should weigh heavily into your decision. Your husband or wife’s opinion about your favorite cousin might be completely different than yours.

Have a conversation now with your family about who would stay and why, try to put personal feelings aside and come to a rational conclusion about whether they would be an asset or a hindrance to your survival plan. Also, try not to get into an argument when you’re talking about this, a divorce is the last thing you want.

3. How Helpful Have They Been?

During your conversation with your family your past experiences with this person are bound to come up. What is their personality like? And how has our past relationship been?

Some people are helpful, some are all about themselves and some people are know it all’s. We can tolerate these personality traits now, but in an SHTF situation these traits will be magnified.

4. How Helpful Would They Be?

I dig a little deeper into this later, but think about how they would benefit your situation, what skills do they have that would help you in a disaster situation. Even if someone is a “one upper” and it drives you crazy, they might have skills that would be useful to you.

Do they have carpentry, electrical, gardening or welding skills? In situations like these we will need to weigh the good with the bad to figure out if we give them a thumbs up, or a thumbs down.

5. What Challenges Do They Bring?

Just as important as thinking about what they bring to the table is what they will be taking from the table. The truth is that any time you add someone to the equation the situation becomes more complicated, and sometimes the negatives so outweigh the positives you need to make that tough decision.

The Double Edged Sward

As much as it drives me nuts knowing that I shouldn’t have to prepare for someone who doesn’t see why it’s important, I do understand that this is a catch 22 that I might have to deal with.

We can barely prepare for ourselves, let alone for the family members that might end up on our doorstep, but unless you are willing to turn everyone away it is a problem you are bound to face.

One other option that could be another article all by itself is bugging out altogether. We always think about security from marauders and criminals, but what if so many people end up at your door that you have no option other than leave, you might have to.

How Much Extra do you Prepare?

Because we can only do what we can do, and sometimes storage space and money are limited I think more along the lines of “how can they make my situation better?” Maybe saying that you should turn this into a positive is a little optimistic, but at least try to make it a little less negative.

Storing extra beans, rice, flour and dry goods will go a long way and give you the basics you will need, but at some point it will run out. Have plans in place to use them like you would an employee, start thinking like a post collapse CEO.

Set the guidelines and expectations from day one. You need to let them know that if you are going to let them stay there for however long that might be you expect them to help. What is impossible for 2 or 3 people to do in a day might be possible with more people, expanding the garden, foraging, hunting, raising more animals for food and building/repairing will become more possible with more people.

The Come to Jesus Talk

At first we might need to lower our expectations because most unprepared people will try to hold on to their Pollyanna reality as long as possible, they will be like a junkies going through withdraws. This is why it’s important to set your expectations from day one.

You might hear things like “why are you rationing the water? This will be over in a day or two?” or “Look at all this food, were going to eat like kings!” These people might have no idea what we could be in for, and need to be set straight before it becomes a problem.

At some point it might become necessary to have what I call the “come to Jesus talk” people will tell you whatever you want to hear to get your help, but if they are not holding up their end of the bargain you might have to have the tough conversation neither one of you want to have.

You might have to say…

“This is what you told me you would do when you came here, and this is what you are actually doing (or not doing), how are we going to fix this? Does this mean you need to go? Or are you going to get onboard and pull your weight?”

Problems like these are bound to happen, and these are situations we need to be able to face, otherwise disappearing and not letting people know where you are might be the better option.

What Would you Do?

This is a question a friend in our Facebook group posed and we dig into it because it is a situation we might need to think about. Would you turn people away and why? Let us know in the comments below.

The Main Component To Survival That Everyone Needs To Consider: Stockpiling Food Might Be Your Best Investment When The SHTF

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Today I wanted to share tips for how to stockpile food for emergencies that anyone can use. I will focus on preppers who are just starting out, but I think some ideas in the topics below could be useful to anyone looking to ensure their family has food and does not go hungry.

I believe there are 5 main components to survival that everyone needs to consider. They are simply Water, Food, Shelter, Security and Hygiene.  The need for water and how you can easily store water for emergencies that render your traditional methods of obtaining water impossible. Water is more important to life than food or at least you can live longer without food than you can water, but they are both important.

Why do you need to stockpile food for emergencies?

If you are new to prepping, you may have something that triggered your awareness of the subject. Preppers have many reasons for doing what they do and no two preppers are alike. Some are preparing for the end of the world, but most see situations in our daily lives that give a perfect reason to stock up supplies. You have only to look at the recent winter storm that affected large swaths of the Eastern Seaboard to have a perfect example of why you don’t want to be left without a means to feed your family.

It seems almost cliché at this point, but invariably it always happens when a winter storm is forecast. Everyone rushes out to the store and certain food supplies are wiped out. Images of empty shelves are shown on practically every newscast and eventually prepper websites. Food shortages during simple storms are common if not expected. We don’t really even blink anymore because we are so used to this practice of waiting until the last-minute and then hitting the local grocery store on the way home from work to grab some basic necessities or comfort food.

If you can’t live for more than 3 days without going to the store, it’s time to reevaluate your family’s readiness. The statistic we hear most of the time is that the average home has only 3 days’ worth of food in it. If this is true, where would you be on day three if you had not been able to make it to the grocery store before the storm? What if instead of a snow storm, a virus outbreak had occurred and everyone was told to stay indoors to prevent infection? Each of us should have more food on hand that our families and friends will eat than is absolutely necessary to prevent surprises from leaving you hungry.

How much food do you need to store?

In the example above I used a virus outbreak as the condition that would prevent you from getting to the store. There are others though and weather could certainly be one of them. Some storms where I live have left roads impassable for upwards of a week. Could we walk to the store? Sure, but what if the stores having already been cleared of just about all of the food were closed? What if power outages prevented them from conducting any transactions? These are things you should consider.

Prepping is not something I ever consider you can accomplish. By that I mean, you are never going to be fully prepared. You may be much better prepared than some or all of the people around you, but you will never be 100% self-sufficient. Prepping should be done incrementally even if you have more money than you know what to do with because as you start to stock up food you learn lessons.

A good rule of thumb for me is to start small when you are beginning to stockpile food for emergencies. You don’t need a year of freeze-dried foods to start with. Try just having a week or two of extra groceries that your family already eats. This is accomplished without any exotic storage needs usually or 5 gallon buckets of grains you have to figure out how to prepare.

What are the best types of food to stockpile?

My wife purchases the groceries and I started out by giving her extra money to simply buy more food. I did this in the beginning because she is a much better shopper than I am and will always save more money than me. This worked great because she was easily able to fill our pantry and had plenty of meals planned to last us well over 30 days. Sure, at the end of that 30 days of food we would be getting into more exotic cans of mushrooms and soups that are better left as part of a recipe as opposed to your entire meal, but we wouldn’t starve.

Once we had a month worth of food and water stored up, I started looking at other options. I think each person should have a layered approach to food storage. This gives you flexibility and more importantly variety that as you go out to 6 months or 1 year or 2 will be important. My own personal goal is 2 years’ worth of food stockpiled for my family but that isn’t made up of only food from our grocery store. That can certainly be done though with a very good rotation plan.

Food storage should ideally cover the following:

Short Term Food Storage – The best and simplest foods are like I said above, what your family eats every day. One thing to consider is that the bulk of this food should be non-perishable in case you lose power. Canned foods are great as well as pastas, drink mixes and staples. These usually last at least a year.

Medium Term Food Storage – For the 5 – 10 year range MRE’s are a great option although they are heavier and their convenience comes at a higher price. I have several boxes of these and I like MRE’s because they are self-contained and don’t really need any water. Freeze dried camping foods like Mountain House are another great option to just add hot water to. Rice and beans make great additions to this category because you don’t really have to do anything crazy to store them as long as they are kept cool and dry.

Long Term Food Storage – When you start to look at foods that will keep for many years you get into stored grains like Hard Red Winter Wheat that you store in sealed 5 gallon buckets. Freeze dried food from any one of many suppliers out there keep for 20 years usually and are individually wrapped Mylar packets. They require water to re-hydrate but the taste can be surprisingly good. Make sure you have seasonings though….

Renewable Food Storage – This is when you have to get your inner farmer working. Renewable foods are an intensive garden, small livestock like chickens or rabbits and the occasional wild game caught either through hunting or snares. In the worst disasters, your food will run out so having a plan for that ahead of time will help you prepare.

How do you plan for your food eventually running out?

I have a mix of the food storage options above. We eat on our grocery store items every day, but I also have MRE’s and a pretty large amount of freeze-dried foods stored. We also have the grains I mentioned and the all-important grain mill to grind them into flour. Several hundred pounds of rice and beans round out the equation.

Stockpiling food is only the start. We have a garden and small flock of chickens. The stored food is just to get us through the worst of the disaster. Hopefully before our food runs out whatever disaster has happened will be mitigated and life will have returned to some sense of normality. If not, we have a huge leg up that will allow us to further harvest our garden to put away food like the pioneers had to do. It is an approach that gives us some sense of security and prepares us to come out on the other side still alive.

What is your plan to stockpile food for emergencies?