Lost Remedies from Our Forefathers: Our Grandparents Knew (That Most Of Us Have Forgotten)

apple-cider-vinegar

Often my grandmother’s remedies worked faster and more effectively than conventional treatments. These lost remedies can treat and improve a variety of conditions. Whether you have a headache, stomachache, or sore throat, you can quickly find something around the house to relieve pain.

Lost Remedies From Our Grandfathers:

Lost remedies Vinegar SocksVinegar Socks

If you have high fever, just soak your socks in vinegar. Keep them on your feet for about 20 minutes, and refresh them every half hour until the temperature begins to drop. You can use regular or apple vinegar.

 


 

Salt Socks

Salt is used not only to flavor food but also for healing purposes. Heat a handful of salt in a pan until it gets very hot. Put the salt in a towel, and then put it on your chest and hold it until it is cold. You can also take a handful of it and put it in a basin.

Pour hot water over it, and then keep your feet in there for at least 10 minutes.

Don’t wipe your feet off; just put on some socks and get under some blankets as soon as possible.


polenta on chest remedyPolenta

You can wrap hot polenta in a piece of gauze and put it on your chest close to your neck.

It’s best if you do this in the evenings before going to bed.


Walnut Tea Remedy lostNut Shells Tea

If you have a bad cough, you could always make tea from nut shells. You can put around five ounces in a pot and boil it.


Onion Tea

Yes, the taste is awful, but you drink it because you need it, not for pleasure. Just take a big onion and boil it well.

Leave it covered for a couple of minutes, and when is not too hot, just drink it in a big gulp.


SodoulSodoul

My favorite dessert when I was a kid and had a cold was Sodoul. You need an egg, milk, and either sugar or honey. These three ingredients make a wonderful remedy for any sore throat, and it is actually very tasty. Bring the milk to a boil, rub the yolk with sugar or honey, pour the hot liquid over it, and drink. After the second cup, you won’t remember the pain.


Black Black RadishRadish

Wash a black radish, make a hole in it, and put a teaspoon of sugar in it. Put in next to a heat source, such as a cooker or a radiator. After a couple of hours, a syrup will form that you can drink to soothe your throat.


Pine Syrup

If you have a sore throat, a couple of teaspoons of pine syrup will alleviate the pain.

Rinse 1 cup needles, then finely chop in a food processor. Bring 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons water, 2 tablespoons corn syrup and a pinch of salt to a boil in a saucepan, whisking, then boil 1 minute without stirring. Remove from the heat, add the needles and steep 2 to 3 hours. Strain the syrup and refrigerate up to a month. It tastes great in cocktails!


Salt Water

If you have a bad cough you can gargle with salt water or with freshly squeezed lemon juice. Or you can mix vinegar, honey, and warm water and drink it.

 


Cabbage Leaves

Cabbage leavesCabbage is renowned for its anti-inflammatory properties. You can also use Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, or green salad. These plants accelerate toxin elimination from the organism and protects tissues from cold. You need two or three leafs of cabbage softened in boiled water or brushed with a little oil; put them around the neck, and cover them with a towel or a scarf. Keep them there for a couple of hours.


Potato Slices

You can treat headaches or migraines with potato slices. You need two or three slices of raw potato that you just put on your forehead and keep in place with a scarf. If the pain is still there after a while, then you should drink warm potato juice. You grate the raw potato, you squeeze it, and afterwards you drink about a quarter of a glass three times a day. The potato has anti-hemorrhagic and anti-anemic qualities, vitamin A, vitamin K, sulfur (an element that combats excess oil), and vitamin C.


Horseradish

Horseradish RemedyHorseradish is a good remedy for sinusitis. Wrap up two to three teaspoons of grated horseradish, and apply to the root of the nose or forehead. Keep it up until a burning sensation occurs on the skin. Horseradish applied externally can cause skin redness and irritation. Protect the skin with a moisturizer applied at least a quarter of an hour before in a thick layer. 


Walnut Leaves

Due to the disinfectant, astringent, and healing properties, walnut leaves are used to treat skin problems. A rash can be removed with a decoction prepared from 30–40 grams of green walnut leaves per liter of water. Boil the leaves for fifteen minutes on high heat, then leave it to cool down, strain it, and afterwards wash the injured skin using a piece of clean gauze soaked in the decoction.


Other Remedies That Our Forefathers Used For:

Skin Irritations

  • For irritated skin due to shaving, you can make chamomile tea. Allow it to cool down, filter it, then refrigerate it. Using a cotton ball, rub the irritated spots for about 10 minutes.
  • If the skin irritation is a result of chickenpox, you can take a warm bath with oatmeal to soothe and reduce the desire to scratch.Are you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800’s for up to three years? Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now…
    WATCH THIS VIDEO and you will find many interesting things!

    lost-ways

Stings

  • If a bee stings you, just put parsley, honey, or salt on the spot.
  • In cases where the stings are more severe, bandage the place with a poultice made from onions, leeks, or raw cabbage.
  • Apply fresh plantain leaves, basil, sage, or rattle. Make sure you crush them well to release the active substances.

Burns

  • To treat burns, chop an onion and gently rub it on the affected area. The substances emitted from the onion layers can work wonders on the burned area.
  • Cut a potato and put the slices on the burn.
  • Use the inside of a banana peel or even toothpaste on the burn.
  • Also try putting a raw beaten eggon it (this creates a kind of coating that neutralizes the burned skin), or rub buckthorn oil on it.
  • To relive the pain and stop the formation of blisters, you can grate a carrot and apply it as a poultice.

Cuts, Scratches, and Bruises

  • For minor cuts and scratches, wash the place with marigold oil, and rub the affected area with the inside of a banana peel.
  • To heal a bruise, put soaked bread in vinegar or wine and rub the spot with it.

Conjunctivitis

  • To treat conjunctivitis, put a few drops of cabbage juice in your eyes. Also, boil 2 tablespoons of crushed fennel seeds in five glasses of water, wait for it to cool down, filter it, and wash your eyes a couple of times a day. You can do the same thing with chamomile Furthermore, add some drops of castor oil or a few drops of egg white.

Toothaches

  • Clove oil is a well-known treatment for toothaches. Soak a cotton ball in clove oil, and press it on the painful area. It also relieves pain to chew two or three cloves.
  • Garlic ToothAnother natural remedy is garlic. Take a clove, and press it onto the tooth. Garlic juice is a natural anesthetic that acts swiftly and effectively. If you get used to eating raw garlic every morning, your teeth will strengthen and will not be so sensitive to cold or sweet foods.
  • Onions have the same properties as garlic and are excellent for strengthening teeth. Chew for three minutes a day, and you will avoid pain.
  • Lemon is an important source of vitamin C but also a good remedy for teeth that are affected by improper nutrition. Wash your mouth with the lemon juice in the morning, as soon as you wake up. Bacteria and plaque will be removed, and you will have clean teeth and fresh breath.
  • Take a glass of lukewarm water and add half a teaspoon of salt. Rinse your mouth with this solution every few hours.
  • Put some oregano leaves in a cup of boiling water, keep them there for five minutes, and then leave it to cool to an infusion. Then make a gargle.
  • Prepare a paste of black pepper and basil leaves, and apply on the painful area.

Corns

  • Boil hawthorn root in water until it turns brown. Put your feet in that water as hot as you can take it. Do this daily for two weeks. The result will be seen after a few days.

Calcium Deficiency

  • Mix 1 teaspoon sesame mills mixed with honey and a few drops of lemon. Take it every morning for 20 days out of each month. Do this for at least three months.

Sunburn

  • Dissolve baking soda in water, and apply it with the help of a compress to the affected area. Also, you can take a warm bath in the tub, adding half a cup. After the bath, let the water dry on your skin; do not use a towel. Baking soda is refreshing and helps to rehydrate skin.
  • Gently rub the affected areas with slices of watermelon. They are soft and will smooth the area affected by sunburn.
  • Mix 20–25 drops of lavender oil in a cup of water, and pour the mixture over the affected area.
  • Mix the juice of three lemons with two cups of cold water, and apply it to the sunburn. The lemon will cool the burn, will act as a disinfectant, and will help the regeneration of the skin.
  • Lost remedies sun burnMake compresses with milk, and apply them on the affected area for 20 minutes, repeating the process every two hours; then remove the milk from the skin. The fat contained in milk is very helpful for burns. You can also mix one cup of skim milk, four cups of cold water, and some ice cubes, blend it, and afterwards apply it on the affected area with a compress.
  • Cover the affected area with cooking oil, and sprinkle ginger oil over it so that you can facilitate the healing process.
  • Apply peppermint oil on the affected area. You can also make a mint tea to wash the affected area.
  • Grate a potato, and apply it on the affected area. The starch will cool and smooth the area.

If you’re interested in learning more old remedies, you should read The Lost Book Of Remedies.

The physical book has 300 pages, with 3 colored pictures for every plant and for every medicine.

Lost Book of Remedies pages

It was written by Claude Davis, whose grandfather was one of the greatest healers in America. Claude took his grandfather’s lifelong plant journal, which he used to treat thousands of people, and adapted it into this book.

Learn More…

Lost Book of Remedies cover

Top 6 Anti-Cancer Fruits (+3 Amazing Recipes)

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The American Cancer Society shows that cancer is considered the second most common cause of death in the United States.

It is characterized by the uncontrolled development of abnormal cells harming your body in different ways. There are multiple types of cancer such as skin, breast, ovarian, lung, pancreatic, colon, lymphoma, and prostate. Aging, excessive alcohol intake, excessive smoking, overexposure to the sun, exposure to harmful chemicals, obesity, and genetics are some of the factors that increase your risk of developing cancer. You can’t manage hereditary and a few environmental factors, but you can reduce your chance of cancer by making lifestyle choices and healthy diet.

There are many fruits rich in phytochemicals and antioxidants that give anti-cancer benefits. According to studies, a higher fruit and vegetable intake is related to lower risks of cancer in the colon, lungs, pancreas, stomach, and oral cavity.

Let’s check out these following six anti-cancer fruits.

Anti-Cancer Fruits

1.Goji Berry Or Chinese Wolfberry

Goji berry ranks among the top 120 medicinal herbs in the world. It can help to provide strength and extend lifespan. It also works upon both the kidney and liver channels to provide detoxification and nourishment. Besides, its dense lineup of glycoconjugates and polysaccharides show unique immunomodulatory, antitumoral, and antioxidant agents. Administration of polysaccharide-protein complexes extracted from goji berry has indicated benefits in reducing the development and spread of cancer cells.

2. Blueberries

Blueberries are abundant in nutrients that help to combat various diseases including cancer. According to American scientists, blueberry phenolic compounds may help prevent cancer cell division, guard the DNA against oxidative damage, and decrease the production of pro-inflammatory molecules. Along with that, blueberries are storehouses of anthocyanidins, which are effective at inhibiting the development of blood vessels feeding the tumor cells. Apart from that, they are full of antioxidants and cancer-fighting phytonutrients, which all help to neutralize free radicals damaging cells and causing diseases including cancer. Furthermore, they help to decrease cancer risk thanks to their vitamins C and K, manganese and dietary fiber. To reap the anti-cancer advantages, eat about a half cup of frozen or fresh blueberries daily.

3. Grapes

Grape and grape seed extract both are a rich source of the antioxidant resveratrol, which offers anti-cancer benefits. Plus, they may help to block the action of a protein, which leads to cancer growth. Besides, grapes are rich in the anti-inflammatory properties that help to inhibit chronic inflammation and oxidative stress, two main reasons for cancer. According to a 2005 study, the polyphenols from muscadine grapes consist of anti-cancer properties. For this purpose, you can eat one cup of grapes every day. You can also take 150 to 300 mg of grape seed extract with 50 to 75% GSP.

4. Pomegranate

Pomegranate has a good amount of antioxidants that offer anti-cancer benefits. The fruit has shown to prevent the growth of colon, lungs, skin, breast, and prostate cancers. It additionally has a mixture of flavonoids, phenols, tannins, and anthocyanins that aid in modulating cellular biochemistry. For this treatment, it is advisable to consume about ½ to ⅔ cup of pomegranate daily. You can also add it to your morning cereal, fruit salad, and smoothie or enjoy its juice to combat cancer.

5. Peas

Peas are a powerhouse of antioxidants and exhibit antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and cholesterol-lowering effects. They also embrace biologically active compounds such as phytic acid, tannins, phenols, saponins, and isoflavones making them one of the best fruits to prevent colon, larynx, breast, and liver cancers. It is suggested to eat ¼ cup of peas every alternate day. Consume boiled or raw fresh, dark green peas.

6. Avocado

Avocados are filled with healthy fats and vitamin E. This fruit is enjoyed in smoothies, salads, and other food recipes all around the world. A type of fat known as Avocatin B presenting in avocados was found to fight acute myeloid leukemia that is a deadly form of cancer. It is also loaded with cancer-fighting carotenoids. It may help to inhibit DNA mutation and halt prostate cancer cell proliferation. To reap its benefits for cancer, you should eat half an avocado every day. You can also add this rich, creamy, nutty-flavored fruit to smoothies, salads, and toasts.

Learn More…

II. Cancer-Fighting Foods Recipes

1. Anti-Inflammatory Juice Recipe

What You Need

  • Celery stalks – 4
  • Cucumber – ½
  • Pineapple – 1 cup
  • Green apple – ½
  • Spinach – 1 cup
  • Lemon – 1
  • Knob ginger – 1

How To Make

Add all of the above ingredients to a vegetable juicer and gently stir juice. Drink immediately.

Imagini pentru Kale Chips Recipe

2. Kale Chips Recipe

What You Need

  • Bunch kale, chopped – 1
  • Lemon juice – 1 tablespoon
  • Sea salt – ¼ teaspoon
  • Coconut oil – 2 tablespoons

How To Make

Preheat an oven to 350 °F. Chop the kale into ½-inch pieces. Take a large bowl and place all elements in it. Use your hands to massage the oil, sea salt, and lemon juice into the kale. Place the mixture on baking sheets and bake for around 10-12 minutes.

3. Pumpkin Blueberry Pancakes Recipe

What You Need

  • Paleo flour blend – 1 cup
  • Eggs – 2
  • Coconut milk – 1 cup
  • Pumpkin puree – ½ cup
  • Vanilla extract – 2 teaspoons
  • Cinnamon – 1 teaspoon
  • Fresh or frozen blueberries – ½ cup

How To Make

Mix the wet ingredients in a bowl and then whisk in the dry ingredients to avoid clumping. After that, stir in the blueberries. Heat a greased pan over medium heat and pour about 1/3 cup of batter a pancake until the pan is full. Cook until bubbles make on the top of batter and start to pop, flip. Repeat cooking. Finally, serve warm with maple syrup and blueberries.

III. Tips To Minimize Cancer Risk

  • Don’t overheat the cooking oil.
  • Consume foods with generous amounts of antioxidants.
  • Stay away from processed and charred foods.
  • Practice yoga. Keep yourself active.
  • Cook food at low temperatures to inhibit overcooking and charring.
  • Stay away from foods with added sugar.
  • Stay away from heating food in the microwave.
  • Don’t keep your cell phone close to your body.
  • Don’t hold your laptop on your chest or lap.
  • Don’t consume foods with flavoring agents and artificial color.
  • Add herbal supplements to enhance detoxification.

By maintaining good lifestyle habits and eating some healthy fruits, you can avoid cancer and even fight it. So, start incorporating these fruits into your daily diet to live a long and happy life. Do you know other anti-cancer fruits? Have you ever tried any of these cancer-fighting healthy fruits? Feel free to share with us the best natural home remedies that you know, in the comments section below.

If you’re interested in learning more old remedies, you should read The Lost Book Of Remedies.

The physical book has 300 pages, with 3 colored pictures for every plant and for every medicine.

Lost Book of Remedies pages

It was written by Claude Davis, whose grandfather was one of the greatest healers in America. Claude took his grandfather’s lifelong plant journal, which he used to treat thousands of people, and adapted it into this book.

Learn More…

Lost Book of Remedies cover

 

5 Forgotten Plants Our Ancestors Used For Food

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What would you say if I told you that there were between 12k and 25k different enjoyably edible things on our planet but we only actually eat about 500 of them, at the most?

Our ancestors ate quite a larger range of foods than we do today, and many of them had medicinal as well as nutritional benefits.

Read on to learn more about these lost yummies.

I said “enjoyable” because there are actually as many as 100k edible organisms, but they don’t all taste that great. Since there are so many forgotten food options, we’ll focus on the ones that taste good. Many of these may even still be in your backyard, or in the woods around your house, but the value of them has been lost, many of them in just the last 120 years ago or so.

Are you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800’s for up to three years? Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now…
WATCH THIS VIDEO and you will find many interesting things!

lost-ways

Egyptian Onions

Egyptian Onion

Also known as walking onions, these above-ground plants are perennial and the little onions grow just like flowers would on a regular shrub. The reason that they’re called walking onions are because the bulbs fall off and start a new plant the next spring. Walking onions were a staple in kitchen gardens through the 1800’s.

These onions taste stronger than regular onions but the entire plant is edible. The leaves are good to chop up and use as you would scallions, and the little onions are great for soups, stews, or pickling. The beauty here is that you don’t have to replant them in the spring as you would regular onions.

Walking out and picking a few onions off the nearest shrub is a lot easier than going to the garden and pulling them up, too!

You likely won’t see onions the first year but by the second, you will.

Borage

borage

This plant was another staple in our ancestors’ kitchen gardens and I’m not sure why it fell out of favor. It’s easy to grow and creates many seeds in the fall that you can dry for use the next season. It also has several purported health benefits, attracts bees, and repels the tomato hornworm, so it’s a good companion plant for your tomatoes.

Borage has thick, prickly, fuzzy, leaves and pretty purplish star-shaped flowers. Both the leaves and flowers are not only edible, they’re delicious and great for you. The young leaves and flowers have a light, cucumbery flavor that makes them good in salads. Older leaves can be cooked just like other leafy greens and the flowers can be candied, added to salads, and used to make syrup.

Borage is a good source of calcium potassium, iron, and all of the other nutrients found in leafy greens, as well as GLA, an essential omega-6 fatty acid. According to the University of Maryland, GLA helps fight inflammation, skin disorders, ADHD, arthritis, atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, and diabetes.

Historically, Borage was also used to treat skin complaints and promote breast milk production and reproductive plants as well as the aforementioned conditions.

Learn More…

Mugwort

This aromatic has been used for centuries medicinally and is pretty good in a salad as well because it tastes like lettuce. There are several different species that are used but the one that’s most common in the US is called common mugwort or Common Wormwood. It’s prevalent in the Eastern and Northwestern US. It’s well adapted to grow in rocky soil.

The leaves are edible, with a slightly bitter flavor. They can be used in salads or cooked in soups and is also used to make tea and alcoholic beverages. They’re frequently dried and used as a meat and fish seasoning. You can eat the flowers, too.

Fun fact: mugwort was used before hops to make beer, and a cousin species of mugwort was used to make the hallucinogenic alcoholic drink, absinthe!

This may have originated because mugwort has long been used to aid in digestion. It’s commonly used to treat cramps, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, menstrual cramps, anxiety, insomnia, depression, irritability. Be careful though; it’s used to treat menstrual cramps because it tightens the uterine muscles, which can cause abortion, especially in the first trimester.

Now, for some survivor and homesteading uses: the furry underside can be scraped off and used as tinder, the stalks are good for kindling and the dried leaves will keep a fire smoldering for a long time, and it’s also a natural insecticide.

Be careful growing mugwort because it will take over your garden if you’re not careful. Growing in pots is a good way to avoid this. Do your research on specific mugwort species because different species have different uses.

Learn More…

Purslane

Purslane

You probably have this plant growing on your property and don’t even know it! You know that succulent weed with pretty little yellow flowers that grows in your sidewalk cracks, or between bricks in your garden wall? Yup, that’s purslane. It’s been used for thousands of years in the Middle East as a food source and made its way to the US before Columbus did.

The side-walk purslane also has a sea-dwelling cousin that’s edible and both were a common food source for Native Americans, and later settlers and pioneers. Over the last century or so, purslane has mysteriously slipped from the pages of cookbooks to the pages of horticulture books, which is sad. The entire plant is edible.

Purslane is good in salads and the mucilage (slimy stuff) inside the leaves is a good thickener. Purslane was used to make beer before hops entered the picture.

The leaves are packed with omega-3s along with vitamins found in other leafy greens and have a lemony flavor. It’s often used in place of spinach or arugula in salads but can be cooked, too. It’s good in soups and the seeds can be ground into flour.

From a prepper’s point of view, purslane is valuable because it grows in arid or dry places where other edibles are scarce.

Salsify

Salsify

Salsify is a root vegetable that dates back to the 500’s.

It looks kind of like a white carrot. It’s white on the inside and beige on the outside.

Unlike carrots, the tops look more like dark, thick grass. It’s often called oyster plant because some say the taste is reminiscent of oysters, though others call it nutty tasting.

The root is cooked similarly to carrots; toss it in soups or roasts, cook them alone or mash them. The greens are the same as other greens; use them in salads, cook them down, or sauté them in butter. They taste similar to asparagus or chicory.

Nutritionally, they’re similar to other greens and are purported to help remove impurities from the blood. Salsify was a staple food for centuries and is now making a culinary comeback.

These are just a few of the staple foods of our ancestors that have been lost by the wayside in the name of processed foods and grocery stores. There are quite literally thousands of other foods that are edible but unknown to most palates, and we might be forced to use them to survive.

If you miss the knowledge to grow your own food, click on the banner below to find out more about how our ancestors used to grow food and be self-sufficient with amazing efficiency.

If you’re interested in learning more old remedies, you should read The Lost Book Of Remedies.

The physical book has 300 pages, with 3 colored pictures for every plant and for every medicine.

Lost Book of Remedies pages

It was written by Claude Davis, whose grandfather was one of the greatest healers in America. Claude took his grandfather’s lifelong plant journal, which he used to treat thousands of people, and adapted it into this book.

Learn More…

Lost Book of Remedies cover

 

 

Back to Basics – Gardening Wisdom From Thomas Jefferson: 5 Things You Should Learn

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When they consider Thomas Jefferson, many Americans first think of him as the author of the Declaration of Independence or as our nation’s third president, who was responsible for the Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark expedition. However, Jefferson’s contributions go deeper than those accomplishments.

Jefferson was a true Renaissance man with a variety of interests and hobbies. He was an accomplished architect, an inventor and a violinist. He could read more than five languages. Jefferson also was a horticulturist who made important contributions to American gardening.

In a letter to Charles W. Peale in 1811, Jefferson wrote, “No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden. … But though an old man, I am but a young gardener.”

At Monticello, his beloved Virginia estate, Jefferson became a pioneer of gardening practices that are useful for us today. Always passionate about growing things, Jefferson further developed this interest during a diplomatic trip to England in 1786 with his long-time friend John Adams.

Here are five examples of Thomas Jefferson’s gardening wisdom.During the two-month trip, he was able to tour and examine many English gardens. Those observations became the basis for his own extensive gardening ideas. Much of what he learned can be applied to any garden of any size.

Are you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800’s for up to three years? Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now…
WATCH THIS VIDEO and you will find many interesting things!

lost-ways

1. Experiment … extensively

Jefferson once wrote that the “greatest service which can be rendered to any country is to add a useful plant to its culture.” When he traveled throughout our young country and abroad, Jefferson often exchanged seeds and seedlings with other gardeners. He enjoyed cultivating those seeds and young plants in his Monticello garden.

Because he grew a variety of crops, including a mix of tropical species with cool weather crops, he devised a unique terraced landscape for his 1,000-foot-long vegetable garden. By placing the garden on a south-facing slope, he was able to capture abundant sunshine.

Creating this unique form of “hanging garden” involved the removal of about 600,000 cubic feet of red clay and the creation of a 1,000-foot-long rock wall that was 15-feet tall in some places.

2. Grow what you eat

Jefferson loved to eat vegetables. In fact, he wrote that “they constitute my principal diet.” Because of his extensive travels, he was exposed to a wide variety of cuisines. He frequently took recipes back home with him and encouraged his cooks to use Monticello’s homegrown produce in new ways. In this way, he created a new American type of cuisine he described as ‘half-French and half-Virginian.”

His Monticello garden featured 330 different varieties of vegetables and 170 varieties of fruits. According to Monticello gardening expert Peter Hatch, Jefferson’s garden inspired a “revolutionary cuisine.” A Monticello recipe for okra soup, for instance, reflects influences from Native Americans (lima beans), Europe (potatoes and tomatoes) and Africa via the West Indies (okra).

Karen Hess, a noted culinary historian, called Jefferson “our most illustrious epicure, in fact, our only epicurean President.”

3. Go natural

Jefferson would be quite at home with the organic gardening movement of today. When his daughter, Martha, wrote to him while he was in Philadelphia serving as secretary of state, she complained about insects damaging the vegetables at Monticello.

He recommended the garden be covered that winter with “a heavy coating of manure. When is rich it bids defiance to droughts, yields in abundance, and of the best quality.”He responded, “I suspect that the insects which have harassed you have been encouraged by the feebleness of your plants; and that has been produced by the lean state of the soil.”

In 2009, White House chef Sam Kass reserved a section of the White House garden to showcase Jefferson’s Tennis Ball and Brown Dutch lettuce, Prickly-Seeded spinach and Marseilles fig, a few of Jefferson’s favorite plants.

4. Keep notes

Jefferson had a scientist’s mind, and because of that, he kept scrupulous notes about what worked and what did not work in his garden.

He recorded his gardening efforts in his Garden Book, a personal journal he maintained from 1766 to 1824. Hatch reports that Jefferson was not afraid to admit defeat in certain gardening circumstances. “On one page in 1809 the word failed is written down 19 times,” Hatch writes.  “He had a holistic view, as we say today, of the gardening process. It is the failure of one thing that is repaired by the success of another.”

5. Make your garden an area for retreatIn his “A General Gardening Calendar,” Jefferson’s only published horticultural work, he offered a monthly guide for kitchen gardening. In the calendar, which was first published in 1824 in the American Farmer, a Baltimore periodical, Jefferson instructs gardeners to plant a thimble spool of lettuce seed every Monday morning from February 1 through September 1.

Jefferson enjoyed the restorative aspects of being a gardener and believed that gardens should be seen, experienced and enjoyed.

For example, he designed and built an octagonal pavilion in a central garden location at Monticello and used this spot as a location for reading, writing and even entertaining.

“No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth,” he once wrote, “and no culture comparable to that of the garden.”

If you’re interested in learning more old remedies, you should read The Lost Book Of Remedies.

The physical book has 300 pages, with 3 colored pictures for every plant and for every medicine.

Lost Book of Remedies pages

It was written by Claude Davis, whose grandfather was one of the greatest healers in America. Claude took his grandfather’s lifelong plant journal, which he used to treat thousands of people, and adapted it into this book.

Learn More…

Lost Book of Remedies cover

30 Lost Ways of Survival Skills From Our Grandfathers That Will Actually Help You in Any Situation

pioneer man must replace his oxen after it dies

People really should avert their gaze from the modern survival thinking for just a bit and also look at how the guys who wandered the west 150 or so years ago did it.

1.Community – We were not meant to survive in isolation forever. There are many skills we can learn from one another. Nothing will help people survive more than a tight knit community that cares for its members. In this community, you will find different skills, access to different resources, and a psychological morale improvement. Finding others with the same mindset will help you survive long-term, and make the situation far more bearable than braving the dark times alone.

Turns out the popular image of the Old West as a place where manly men solved their differences by shooting themselves in the face simply isn’t true. People were more likely to cooperate than fight – in a harsh and lawless world, it was better to side with your neighbor for mutual benefit than start shooting. One estimate places the number of bank robberies at about a dozen for the entire frontier period.

2.Many small towns in the Texas Hill Country have a secret. Beneath our town’s main street are old tunnels that were built to protect settlers in case of Indian raids. That makes me feel a little safer next time I shop for pickles knowing that if a nuclear bomb goes off my family can go underground. Build or have in mind a hideout in your BOL or better said a hideout in your hideout.

3.We don’t dial 911” – there won’t be any. Every type of gun known to man is here to protect their family and property. A good rule is to honk first when driving up unexpectedly to a ranch so as not to spook anyone.  Watching those old cowboy movies gave me a good idea: use both hands when shooting guns.

4.Shooting your dinner. Or shooting to protect yourself. Learn to hit something with a bullet and you’ll be better fed and it may even keep you and your family alive.

5.Repairing guns and reusing ammo. Limited or no ammo availability for my SHTF Guns meant the brass has to last as long as possible. Semi-auto rifles are harder on brass than bolt, falling block or other type’s rifles. With semi-autos, you have brass elongation; you need to trim your brass frequently, full-length size on every load. And after a few reloads, you basically run out of brass life.

A broken gunstock could be repaired with rawhide. The wet, pliable hide would be stretched over the broken pieces at the break, then either laced or nailed in place. As the rawhide dried it shrank, holding the broken stock together as effectively as if it had been replaced.

6.Stockpiling Wood and keeping warm was a chore in winter. About the only thing folks had to burn was wood. There was a woodpile or a woodshed associated with just about every house. There were no iron stoves in early Texas – they didn’t start coming in until late in the Republic period. Heat came from a fireplace, & it generally wasn’t very effective. Along the Rio Grande, especially in the poorer regions, there were no fireplaces in houses. That’s because Spain & later Mexico taxed chimneys. Those people cooked out-of-doors. Because they mostly built of adobe, their house – walls were very thick, so even a small fire indoors would keep the place fairly warm. In summer going into a properly – built adobe house is like walking into a cave. They stay fairly cool even on the hottest days.

7.Brain Tanning Leather – learning the process of skinning a deer, fleshing, stretching, drying, scraping, soaking, brain tanning, and then smoking the hide to waterproof. Deer hides, horse hides, coon hides – was used for just about everything, & rawhide was very useful. It used to be called ‘Mexican iron.’ The stuff is stiff as a plank, but if you put it in boiling water for a while, it becomes pliable. You can then use it in place of nails to tie a corral’s stringers to the posts. As it dried it would shrink, holding the stringers as effectively as nails.

8.Mostly, clothing was hand-made on the frontier. Almost any source of cloth could be used to make shirts or dresses. One of the reasons floursacks, for many years, were made of patterned cloth, was the fact that women collected them to make shirts or dresses, for themselves, their husbands, & their children. I can remember when I was a kid, farm ladies using white flour sacks to make children’s underwear.

9.Blacksmithing. Being able to make something useful like a horseshoe, tool, or cooking utensil from scrap metal could come in very handy. This is a skill people will barter for. Blacksmith work does require a good deal of practice and some special equipment, but it’s a skill worth learning and the learning curve is cut a bit if you already know how to weld or do other metal work.

10.Preserving food without a fridge. Many people have forgotten this old method of preserving food, especially meet. Here is one of the easiest methods available and doesn’t take much time.  You will need fresh pork, pickling salt, brown sugar, and crocks or jars for storage.

First, cut the pork into slabs. Generally, four- to six-inch slabs work best. Mix 1/2 pound of pickling salt with 1/4 cup of brown sugar. This is enough to cover twelve pounds of pork. Liberally cover the pork with this mixture. Next, pack the meat into sterilized crocks or jars. You should make sure it is tightly packed. Cover the meat with cheesecloth.

Using the temperature chart of your house, determine where to store your crocks. You need to keep the meat in an area that is about 36°F – no higher than 38°F. You also do not want an area that could see freezing temperatures. Leave the meat in this cool storage for at least one month. After that time, you can wrap the meat in plastic or moisture-proof paper and leave it stored all winter. You now have salt-cured pork for any occasion.

Many older people remember having a smokehouse on their land when they were young. Meat would be salted and hung to cure in these cool, dry areas. You could build a storage room for handing meat without too much work. The room should have excellent air circulation and stay cool without freezing.

Canned Meat – If you are familiar with canning fruits and vegetables, you should know that you can also can meat. You have to make sure you get the temperature of the meat high enough to kill bacteria before it seals. Chicken and beef are good options for canning, as are fish. You can cook the meat before you can and seal it. For example, you could make beef stew and preserve it in cans. Stewed chicken also cans and preserves well. Raw packing is another option you can try as well.

11.Navigation and Orientation – basic compass, map, landmarks; preparation for traveling outdoors; reading nature signs, stars, and sun to navigate through wilderness; knowing the best routes and time to travel.

Whether someone is going to bug in or bug out to somewhere safer, they need to know where they plan to take a stand and stay. Transportation is a very important issue to consider and how much of what they have can be moved to where they are planning to go. Fuel will be a huge consideration as the lack of it prohibits how far someone can go. Something else everyone should understand is how to read maps. You will likely not have any GPS system to guide you and the good old fashioned paper map may be the only way to show you where you are going. Understanding topographic maps is also key here

12.Trapping – trapping animals for clothing and food; using dead falls and snares; proper preparation of traps; understanding their use and safety.

13.Gardening.  and fruits, knowing soil conditions, how to get water to your plants, extending your harvest season, and common garden pests will be vital to having a continuous food supply. Check out The Forgotten Skills of Self-Sufficiency Used by the Mormon Pioneers for some great old-time gardening tips.

14.Saving seeds. The other end of gardening is being able to plant again next year. Saving seed can be kind of intimidating and mysterious, especially for plants like carrots that don’t go to seed in their first growing season. Start with non-hybrid seeds and a reference book like Seed to Seed and practice saving some kind of seed from your next garden. This is definitely a learned skill, but could be vital to a continued food supply.

15.Building a home, or another shelter, or a fort, or a fence. Knowing how to use hand tools and simple machines will go a long way if you have to rebuild.

16.Start a Fire without Matches and learn how to keep the fire going 24/7. Prepare your fireboard. Cut a groove in the fireboard. This will be your track for the spindle.

Take the tip of your spindle and place it in the groove of your fireboard. Start rubbing the tip of the spindle up and down the groove.

Have your tinder nest at the end of the fireboard, so that you’ll plow embers into as you’re rubbing. Once you catch one, blow the nest gently and get that fire going.

17.Cooking over a fire. You may have other methods to cook your food available, like a solar oven or barbeque grill, but an open fire is the most primitive and one of the most common means of cooking in a grid down emergency.

18.Tracking – identifying animal tracks; understanding process of tracking.

19.The Bee Hunter. One of the most important men on the frontier was the bee hunter. Sugar was almost impossible to come by. Honey, which was called ‘long sweetenin” in Texas, was the only source of sweetening for many years.

20.Knowing and preparing wild edibles. Which plants in your area are safe to eat and what parts of them are edible? A little foraging can add variety to your diet or even sustain life if there’s nothing else to eat.

21.Learn how to maintain light at night. One of the most depressing situations is to spend night in near to total darkness. Besides this, not being able to see at night is dangerous. Learning how to make candles and wicks should be a skill to consider learning. Fats and other oils will burn and can be obtained throughout nature and the outdoors. Long term solar battery rechargers for flashlights and LED battery powered lanterns are another option.

22.Maintain proper hygiene. This is one of the top priorities because disease and sickness can and do take down the toughest man. People must realize that after a terrible disaster it is not like someone that goes camping, comes back dirty, and takes a nice long shower or a hot bath. After SHTF the water to the faucets, as well the hot water heater, may not work. Bathing on at least a semi-regular basis is necessary to avoid all sorts of bacteria from building up on the skin and causing a variety of health concerning ailments that will then have to be treated. People should plan on just how they will keep themselves clean, even thinking about sponge baths as an option.

23.A car or a horse?

Some people say about SHTF that unless you’re living on an oil well or in a gas tank you won’t have access to gas.

Riding a horse. They make this look easy in the movies, but there is a learning curve involved. A horse is transportation, a pack animal, and a friend. Learning to ride one can get you places when roads are impassable or vehicles aren’t working. Plus, your gas reserves won’t last forever when SHTF.

Texans love all kinds of horse powered transportation. Should an EMP attack render cars useless, they’ll get around riding their horses or driving their horse drawn carriages, buggy’s, hay wagons, chuck wagons and buck board wagons. During the summer on country roads you can run into wagon trains filled with hundreds of people driving their wagons, which is an awesome sight to behold! And yes they still ride their horses into town for a coke, hamburger and even a beer.

There were vast herds of wild horses in early Texas. The horses were considered an excellent source of meat. Many of them were shot for food. Others were captured, but if a horse resisted being tamed and saddle-broke, it usually wound up on the table.

24. Herbal remedies. When the doctor’s not around, knowing which herbs to use and how to use them to treat common ailments like cough, fever, headache, etc. can be a great blessing to your family or others around that may need the help.

25.Learn first aid. Treating yourself and or others will probably be the only thing someone can do as medical professionals are going to be few and far between. Many places offer free classes on first aid because they want people in the community to be prepared. A good first aid book along with a first aid kit is something every household should have before, during, and after a disaster. Primitive conditions should be expected when anyone is helping someone after a catastrophe. A stockpile of antibiotics are always a good idea. Even acquiring the skill of making your own antibiotics can save lives as infection is something that will become an epidemic, especially with minor cuts and abrasives that are sure to be plenty.

26.Don’t throw away anything that may be useful at some point. Personally, I don’t like to keep too many things in my house. So I throw away much stuff. And most of us do that because we know that if we have to, we can immediately buy another one. But our grandparents NEVER threw away jars, plastic bags, casseroles, boxes, cans, metal in general.

27.Stealth. While the survivalist mindset might seem to stem from weathering bad times, it is actually based in a basic enjoyment of nature. Nature is a gift, and the ability to live comfortably from its provisions is one of the most life-changing experiences a person can ever have. The art of survival seems to have been lost over the years, but before the technology boom in the last century, it was commonplace to know and understand survivalist principles.

One of the most basic skills when in the wild is a combination of two methods. These methods are called the “Fox Walk” and “Wide-Angle Vision.” These were the basic “bread and butter” of how tribal populations would hunt and stalk without leaving any trace. Learning lessons from these peoples, it has enlightened us on how to live from the land.

28.How to pan for gold – Although gold pans were much in evidence during the early days of the Gold Rush, miners used them less and less as time went on and they created better gold extraction devices but much more expensive. Even today, however, some gold seekers will use the light and simple pans for prospecting, systematically sampling gravels as they work up a stream, for example, and knowing that when the gold “color” stops, a vein or two of gold feeding into the stream may be close at hand.

29.Understand the psychology of desperate people. This is a difficult one. After a SHTF event people are going to, simply put, go crazy. That neighbor that was in control during many minor emergencies may be the one pounding on your door with whacked out eyes demanding what you have because they did not prepare for anything. In the Wild West most of the travelers when they spotted another traveler – they went around him thinking it’s wiser not to encounter at all.

30.Every cowboy knows that a rope is an important tool. Sure they can lasso a cow, but it serves so many other uses that it would be impossible to list. Suffice to say that that’s one thing that you never can have enough of and I’ve been known to use my son’s lariat in a pinch to tie down furniture on the utility trailer.

If you’re interested in learning more old remedies, you should read The Lost Book Of Remedies.

The physical book has 300 pages, with 3 colored pictures for every plant and for every medicine.

Lost Book of Remedies pages

It was written by Claude Davis, whose grandfather was one of the greatest healers in America. Claude took his grandfather’s lifelong plant journal, which he used to treat thousands of people, and adapted it into this book.

Learn More…

Lost Book of Remedies cover

5 Herbs Every Prepper Needs In Their First-Aid Kit -Our Grandparents Lifelong Plant Journal

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I have a long history with conventional medicine and allergies. More than a handful of times, I ended up in the hospital due to a reaction from the treatment for an illness. Should the cure be worse than the illness? Well, my mother didn’t think so. She turned to nature for my herbal first aid — and I’ve been using herbs ever since.

One of the best parts about herbal medicine is that it is generally free and can be found right outside your door!

Herbs and weeds have been used as medicine since the beginning of mankind. As a matter of fact, herbs are still the building blocks for many conventional medicines.

According to the University of Minnesota, “It is likely that humans have used plants as medicine for as long as we have existed. Archeological excavations dated as early as 60,000 years ago have found remains of medicinal plant.”

Let’s examine five specific herbs.

Minor Burns and Scrapes: Aloe

Aloe is the only plant that I seem to have a green thumb for. Incidentally, it is the first herb I ever recall using as a child.

Often seen in many homes as a decorative plant, aloe Vera is effective in treating minor burns, sunburns and scrapes.

Aloe Vera is an evergreen succulent that grows wild in tropical climates around the world. In colder climates, aloe Vera can be grown indoors as potted plants.

Aloe contains active compounds that help reduce inflammation and pain. These active compounds help stimulate skin growth and repair, in addition to acting as a moisturizing agent. Medical studies have shown that burns treated with aloe heal quicker than burns treated with silver sulfadiazine.

Bleeding and Cuts: Yarrow

According to mythology, the Greek hero Achilles used yarrow to stop the bleeding in his soldiers’ wounds.

Recently after a construction accident, my husband had a wound on his foot that nearly reached the bone. Unable to get to the doctors, I applied a yarrow compress to get the bleeding under control until he could receive medical attention. We have successfully used yarrow several times through the years to treat wounds and to stop bleeding.

Yarrow is a common weed that often can be found growing on the sides of the road. Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) tends to grow best in sunny and warm climates. However, I’ve had success growing it in my shaded garden, as well.

Through numerous devices – clotting, unclotting, neurovascular control, flavonoids, etc. – yarrow regulates the flow of blood to and from the surface, in and out of the capillaries and venules, thickening and thinning. Through this, it cures all manner of wounds, bruises, hemorrhaging and clotting.

Stings/Bites: Plantain

I bet you’ve walked by this herb thousands of times without even realizing it, but plantain is the perfect treatment for bites and stings. Plantain has astringent properties that help reduce swelling and draw out the toxins from the bite.

When our daughter was just a couple of years old, she was playing with some wind-chimes. Little did I know that hornets had made a nest in them. She ran screaming to me with tears running down her cheeks from the pain. We instantly rushed outside to where I knew plantain was growing, mashed it up, and applied it to the stings. Within just a couple of minutes, the swelling was gone — and so were her tears.

Sickness: Usnea

I often laugh when I think of this herb, because for years I was told it was a sign of disease in a tree. Little did I know that usnea wasn’t a disease, but a cure!

Usnea is a pale grayish-green lichen that grows like leafless mini-shrubs or tassels anchored on bark or twigs. It grows all over the world and can usually be found on sick or dying trees.

Usnea is known to help staph infections, heal wounds, respiratory issues, allergy symptoms, sore throat, fungal infections, urinary infections and sinus infections. Usnea is anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-fungal, making it the perfect herb to treat sickness.

Headache: Willow Bark

Back in the 1980s, I watched a movie where they treated a headache with eating tree bark. That was my first introduction to the medicinal properties found in willow bark. 

From the University of Maryland Medical Center:

“The bark of white willow contains salicin, which is a chemical similar to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). In combination, with the herb’s powerful anti-inflammatory plant compounds (called flavonoids), salicin is thought to be responsible for the pain-relieving and anti-inflammatory effects of the herb. In fact, in the 1800s, salicin was used to develop aspirin. White willow appears to bring pain relief more slowly than aspirin, but its effects may last longer.”

If we take the time to study, learn and observe nature, we will realize that it offers us everything that we need to live. From food to medicine, the answer is often right outside our door

If you’re interested in learning more old remedies, you should read The Lost Book Of Remedies.

The physical book has 300 pages, with 3 colored pictures for every plant and for every medicine.

Lost Book of Remedies pages

It was written by Claude Davis, whose grandfather was one of the greatest healers in America. Claude took his grandfather’s lifelong plant journal, which he used to treat thousands of people, and adapted it into this book.

Learn More…

Lost Book of Remedies cover

14 Critical Lessons From The Great Depression – When Every American Was Worried About Where Their Next Meal

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During the Great Depression in the 1930s, nearly every American was worried about where their next meal was coming from – and for how much longer they would have a roof over their heads. A whole lot has changed in our country since, but those very realistic fears are still keeping preppers up at night.

Now, most preppers know they can open up a long-term food storage pouch and make a meal with just a little hot water and have enough survival camping gear to sleep six of more loved ones, but the underlying premise behind the worries which surfaced in great abundance during the Great Depression are what modern preppers are busy planning to shield themselves from both tomorrow and beyond.

Top 14 Critical Survival Lessons From The Great Depression:

1. Frugality

There are many important lessons we can learn from the folks who survived the Great Depression, but none is more important to apply to our daily lives than frugality. Creating a budget, living within it, now accruing debt, eating food you cook at home and not dining out except for special occasions, are but a few prime examples of living the type of frugal lifestyle that will leave money in your pocket when both it, food, and a paycheck, become scarce.

2. Sewing

Make your clothing last as long as possible by learning how to mend worn garments and repurpose them to give them new life in some other useful manner. You can also save/make extra money by having yard sales to make money on clothing that is in good shape but cannot be passed down, are great ways to avoid waste and always ensuring you and your family have warm coats, work clothes, socks without holes, to wear. The feed sack dresses made by poor farming families embarrassed some of the wearers, but are now considered works of art created expertly Great Depression survivors.

3. Foraging

It was not uncommon for families who lived through the Great Depression to have to forage for their own food and to craft new recipes from what they found, food that was still available in stores that had not shut down, and would fit their shrinking finances.

4. Garden

During the Great Depression, almost everyone had a garden, no matter how wealthy they had been before or where they lived. Every inch of grass around a city housing unit or yard space was dedicated to the growing of food to help prevent starvation, and to use the little bit of money they had to stave off living outdoors – which tens of thousands of former middle class Americans, were forced to do seemingly overnight.

5. Work

Take any type of work that you can get, nothing legal is beneath you – and likely a couple old fashioned illegal jobs, like moonshining, won’t be beneath you when the SHTF either. If your family needs money, do not dip into your savings of go deeper into debt, take a job mopping floors or parking cars if that is all there is available or can fit into your schedule – if taking it as a part-time gig. At the mercy of panicked creditors is not where you want to be if a financial collapse or other long-term disaster happens.

6. Hunting and Fishing

Folks put food into their bellies and garnered the protein they need to keep on working by hunting and fishing extensively – some for the very first time. If you live in a city or the suburbs and cannot hunt on your own land carpool out to public hunting areas in rural counties and harvest meat or fish to preserve and stockpile to save money and in case of emergency – which could be anything from job loss, to regional flooding, to an apocalyptic event.

7. Grocery List

Take a long hard look at your grocery list and eliminate costly items you can either do without or make yourself – even if that means learning how to cook when all you can do now is burn water. Been there, done that. Prepared and processed foods are both the least healthy and some of the most expensive items in the supermarket.

8. Swapping

During the Great Depression folks learned to swap items they were growing or raising with others who were cultivating something else they needed. Bartering nearly became king again during this dark ere. Eggs were traded for haircuts for a scarce job interview, tomatoes swapped for milk, etc. Start taking an inventory of what other members of your community are growing, raising, or services they are providing that you might need during a SHTF event and vice versa.

9. Food Waste

Only enough food was cooked for one meal because either there was not enough to go around of there was no way to preserve it. We should follow these same food conservation lessons today. The level of food waste in the United States is higher than in any other country on the planet.

Do not put leftovers in your fridge and let them go to waste. Make only enough for one meal at a time or better yet, make enough for two meal and freeze half of it. You can also make meals ahead (or meals in a jar) with only the dry items, and stockpile them for busy evenings and emergencies.

10. Avoid Self-Indulgence

For one entire week, track every penny you spend or use – i.e. cellphone package, cable, etc. If you actually tally up how much those morning cups of coffee cost, work lunches, running errands frequently instead of on a designated day to save fuel, impulse buys at a checkout counter, you may very well find that if you took your lunch to work, made your own coffee, and drove wisely, you could save a minimum o $100 per week.

11. Do The Work Yourself

Calling a plumber, electrician, lawn mowing service or other type of laborer can bust your budget quickly. Your skillset (and local laws about certification for skilled labor on home repairs is your live in the city or suburbs) will dictate how often you can do your own home and auto repairs. Work on honing and enhancing your skills so you can be your own handyman and mechanic – or trade services with others who can accomplish the task for you.

12. Air Conditioning

You can live without air conditioning, you really can. If your home has a basement, make it a summer living space to allow the family to stay cool without driving up your electric bill During the Great Depression women soaked sheets in water and hung them in doorways so the blowing air from open windows helped cool down their homes.

13. Commodities

During a crisis of any type, but particularly a financial one, commodities will go sky high before they disappear from store shelves. Learn to use cheaper substitutes, especially ones you can raise yourself, for common recipe ingredients.

To replace sugar in recipes, grow your own stevia plant or sugar beets. You can also use honey, corn syrup, and molasses as a sugar substitute. Evaporated milk or milk you dehydrated yourself, can be used as a substitute for store bought fresh milk. Live somewhere you can at least raise a Nigerian Dwarf dairy goat and you will have a reliable supply of milk – and by extension, cheese and butter.

14. Preserve More Food

Do not limit your food preservation efforts to simply what you can can or dehydrate from your own garden. Look for sales, double or triple coupon deals on foods you can dehydrate or have an extensive shelf life. It is not difficult to dehydrate eggs or dairy products, that are staples of our diet.